Gwandara Woman

Beautiful – this is touching

Juju Films

Gwandara Mother & Child

Gwandara people of Nigeriaspeak Gwandara a West Chadic language, and the closest relative of the Hausa.

Langa Langa Village, Nasarawa State Nigeria

#JujuFilms

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About Jesse Mathewson

Jesse Mathewson is the author of the popular blog, jessetalksback.com and provides commentary to many varied places based on a background that includes education in criminal justice, history, religion and even insurgency tactics and tactical training. His current role in his community is as an organizer of sorts and a preacher of community solidarity and agorism. He also runs Liberty Practical Training, a self defense school specializing in the practical applications of defensive approaches versus the theoretical. As an agorist, voluntaryist and atheist his life is seen as crazy and wild by many, though once they get to know him most realize he is a bluntly honest individual who will give you the shirt off his back if he believes it is necessary to help you. Very simple, "That which is voluntary between all individuals involved is always right, if it is not voluntary, it is always wrong."
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One Response to Gwandara Woman

  1. jeffreycanthony says:

    On the Societas hangouts, we often would get into discussions involving race and culture. One of the thoughts was a belief by a few that while Africans coming to America the way they did was screwed up, the idea that they were given a huge boost in gain via knowledge, technology, and civilization is one thing that was discussed in the pro’s and con’s of those situations.

    Most even today look at Africans as savage still, or way too primitive, but I feel like we’ve lost values, that perhaps we’ve lost track of what’s important, and have become less civilized in our drive for bigger, better, and faster.

    Something to watch if any have time, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i9V871xnGYM

    Touches a little on a different African nation, but might give interesting context that bridges realities for us here in the US.

    Like

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